A walk around London’s Regent’s Park

London’s Regent’s Park

Regent’s Park is one of the glories of London.  Popular with visitors, tourists and Londoner’s alike, it is one of the places where you can stroll, relax, and take in a wide range of activities from gardens to open air theatre.

Designed by John Nash, this is one of the largest of London’s Royal Parks.  It covers 395 acres, reaching up to Primrose Hill which offers some of the best views across London.  Visitors staying in Aparthotels London can easily walk for miles in this beautiful park which includes formal gardens as well as open landscapes.

Queen Mary’s Gardens are very beautiful and contain approximately 12,000   roses – the biggest such collection in London including the Royal Parks rose.  There are also spectacular displays of Delphinums and Begonias, while shrubberies add a touch of shady magic.  This is definitely a garden to visit for its sheer fragrance! It is a wonderful place to sit and relax. The Avenue Gardens are much more formal and have displays of spring bulbs and summer bedding, Victorian style. Much more informal is the Wildlife Garden which has been created with the aid of local schoolchildren. One of the more unusual aspects is a stunning 8 metre long newt which has been made out of earth, turf and flowers. 

Throughout Regents park, there are innumerable statues to catch the attention of passes by, such as the boy and frog sitting on a pedestal in a pond, or the stunning Triton Fountain, and the Lion Vase. 

Tucked away in the Queen Mary’s Garden is the Open Air Theatre.  Set in a natural amphitheatre, it is a favourite venue for theatergoers throughout the summer.  Many come early and enjoy a picnic on the lawn prior to the show.  This summer there two big productions taking place, the stunning musical Jesus Christ Superstar followed by Jane Austen’s delightful Pride & Prejudice. When it comes to accommodation the city offers several options. Yet, Serviced Apartments Central London top them all!

Regent’s Park is also home to the world-famous London Zoo.   This is the oldest scientific zoo in the world.  It was set up for scientific study in 1828, and opened to the public in 1847.  This is a fantastic place to visit, housing animals from all over the world in carefully designed settings which mimic their homelands.  New this year is Land of the Lions involving walk ways through Indian themed areas complete with a train station, crumbling temple and high street.  Other animals to be seen include lemurs, otters, meerkats, hippos, monkeys, tigers, penguins and fruit bats. This zoo was also the setting for one of the iconic scenes in Harry Potter and the Philosphers Stone – the reptile house was used for filming the scene where Harry talks to a python.

So, if you are coming to London and planning to stay for some time then Presidential Marylebone Mayfair might be a great choice for you.