Anyone for cricket or tennis in London?

Cricket & Tennis

The thwack of ball on wood or strings is an essential part of life in London every summer, marking the arrival of the Tennis and Cricket seasons. Thousands of people are attracted from all over the world and book Holiday Apartments London in advance to visit the hallowed grounds of Lords and Wimbledon.  These are locations that have played a major role in the development of both sports and it is hard to imagine either game without Lords or Wimbledon.

Located in Marylebone, Lords Cricket Ground is a haven for cricket lovers. So, If you’re staying at the Presidential Marylebone Mayfair then you are in luck, the ground is only a short tube ride away. This is where you can see the original Ashes Urn, fought over each year by the Australian and English teams.  It is believed to contain the ashes of a cricket ball – although no one knows for sure.  The original urn is always kept in the Museum at the Lords Cricket Ground, no matter which nation is the winner of the championships.  

If there are no games being played, you can take part in guided tours around the site allowing you to explore the player’s dressing rooms, discover the history of cricketing heroes and the secrets of the turf and all of it only a short stroll from serviced apartments Central London. While at Lords, don’t forget to look upwards and see one of the most unusual weather vanes in London.  High above the building, the figure of a hunched man, removing the bails from a wicket can be seen pointing the way the wind is blowing.  Nicknamed Old Father Time, the vane has been in place for over a hundred years and even survived being damaged by a barrage balloon during World War Two.

For Tennis, you have head southwards to Wimbledon.  If you are planning to watch a match, then book early as seats can be hard to obtain especially for the Centre Court games.  Expect congestion around the tube stations as large crowds descend on Wimbledon for every game.

While waiting for games to start, eating bowls of strawberries and cream have become a tradition.  Children from local schools act as ball boys and ball girls, collecting the balls as needed during the matches.  

All the games at Wimbledon are played on grass courts, and these courts are among the oldest in the world.  There are certain traditions and customs which are applicable only to the players.  If the Queen or Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales are present at a match, then the players have to bow or courtesy to them.  

Clothing too is carefully regulated.  You won’t see colours here.  All players have to wear sparkling white, not even off white or cream are allowed.  Any coloured trims must be no wider than one centimetre. If a player turns up in coloured clothing they have to change whether they like it or not.  Most famously in 2002, Anna Kournikova arrived for her game wearing black shorts.  The officials refused to let her play until she changed into white shorts borrowed from her coach.